Nugatory Nougats Have Nothing to Do With Nuggets

Can you write a forty-word synopsis of your story, otherwise known as a nugget? It’s harder than you think. Nuggets are not nugatory undertakings, but like nougats, they are filled with a complicated combination of something tantalizing (like sugar or honey), yet substantial (like roasted nuts).

Here’s my nugget for my recently published middle grade adventure – The Tide Changers – at thirty-seven words:

In a seaside town, a thirteen-year-old boy overcomes his fears of drowning and loss in order to save his missing father. In addition to preventing a cataclysmic disaster, he enables his sister to fulfill her own destiny.

Write your nugget at the beginning of your novel, and keep it where you’ll see it as you work. Refer to it when you’re stumped or concerned that you’ve veered off course. When you’ve finished your novel and revised it, use it as part of your query letter.

Writing a small, meaningful paragraph at the beginning of your journey isn’t trite. It could save you from a sticky situation later and could give your readers a significant story to chew on!

Advertisements

About Sandy Green

I am a poet and children's author. Visit my website at sandradgreen.webs.com
This entry was posted in Food, Writing and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Nugatory Nougats Have Nothing to Do With Nuggets

  1. Pingback: Pitch Perfect – Fifth Floor, Please | The Sandy Side of Life

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s